blood sugar

As I have said in a previous post, I am a diabetic.  To control my diabetes, I take medication in the form of pills and I take a long-acting insulin twice a day.  I also monitor my blood sugars closely, taking my blood glucose readings at least once a day and having blood work done at the hospital once every three months.

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I also try to use exercise and diet to control my blood sugars.

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My ‘before-eating blood sugars’ have recently been in the range of 7 to 14 mmol/l (milimoles per liter) – they should be between 4 and 7.   My blood sugar readings follow along with the food I have eaten.  If I eat late at night or if I have a baked dessert after supper, I always find my blood sugars up in the morning.

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Before Christmas, my blood sugars were excellent.  They were responding well to my regular exercise (I bike on my stationary cycle once every two or three days)  and to my better eating habits.  However, in spite of the fact that I did not gain weight over Christmas, my blood glucose readings are higher than they should be.

unhappy Alexandra
unhappy Alexandra

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The chart below shows the difference.  For October (the first 25 readings) my early morning blood sugars did not go above 10.  For January 2014 (the next 20 readings) they are often above 10.

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blood sugars

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I know from past experience that blood sugar control is a bit like a fall down the stairs.  Once you start to fall, it is hard to stop the tumble and every step adds its injuries.  Once you get to the bottom of the stairs, you just lay there and it’s hard to get up and get back to normal.  Once I overeat one day and get a bad blood sugar reading, guilt and fear and avoidance take over.  Like falling downstairs, every day of poor control contributes to an overall pattern of high readings.  It’s like my body says, ‘Oh, high sugars must be normal for me. Give me sugar.’  Part of the problem is avoidance … when my blood sugars are high, I don’t take my blood sugar readings (fear?) and sometimes I conveniently ‘forget’ my medication (denial?).  It takes several days of control to get over the guilt and get my blood sugars back to normal.

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To regain control I must:

  • control my evening eating
  • take my blood sugar readings (don’t be afraid to see the readings)
  • take my medications (don’t stick my head in the sand)

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I’ll get my act together, and get back on track, and let you know how I do …

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Best always, Alexandra

Alexandra dismayed
Alexandra dismayed
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